Tag Archives: editor

On Procrastination

Ah, procrastination. We’re all guilty of it to different degrees.

For me, it’s actually knuckling down to some serious story writing. My procrastinating has spanned several years and though I’ve written loads of things in that time, it was all ‘work’. Way back when, I’d originally come up with the germ of a good idea, sketched out a plot and made a start. But where would it go? Would it be long enough? What would I do with it? Would anyone want to read it? All these questions, as well as good old life getting in the way, prevented me from getting any further. However, with a little more time on my hands of late, I decided to get stuck in.

As an editor, I’ve been my own worst enemy in some ways. It’s been tough to let the words flow without constantly editing them! I’ve been continuing to fight against this though and a flurry of activity (well, for me) over the last few weeks has brought me to a place where I know how my story ends. I’m filling in some detail and developing some areas of the plot, but after that, well, at least I’ll have a tale to tell.

That’s the thing. There’s tons of ways you’ll try and tell yourself it’s not the right time to start your book. You don’t know how it ends. You don’t have all your characters. Your  grammar is a little shaky. The list goes on, but none of it matters. Just write. After all, nobody ever published their first draft.

And, when you’ve got your story to a stage where you think it’s worth reading, you can always send it to me to edit. After all, I feel your pain!

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Filed under Editing, Uncategorized, Writing

A Summer of Verne

Jules Verne

I may have been familiar with some of his most popular work thanks to the old film adaptions I watched my childhood, but until this summer, I’m ashamed to admit that I’d never read anything by Jules Verne.

There, I said it. Feels better to get it out in the open. I ‘m still only two books better off, but what an amazing pair of books they are. It’s admittedly a massively overused phrase but 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and its Sequel The Mysterious Island really have stood the test of time as pieces of literature. A good story is a good story and will always trump a work which falls over itself to shoe-horn as many fancy words in as it can. That’s not to say Verne didn’t show literary flair but his emphasis was always on keeping the reader gripped and taking them on a fantastical journey.

All the while I was reading, I was reminding myself that they were translations too, and what skill Verne must’ve had to ensure the many works he wrote in his native French could be enjoyed by everyone. They’re a fascinating time capsule as well, from a time when it wasn’t easy to visit other countries, experience other cultures, or an everyday occurrence to meet someone with a different colour of skin.

In 20,000 Leagues…, Verne not only introduced one of popular culture’s most enduring figures in the enigmatic Captain Nemo, but one of its greatest feats of engineering, his mighty vessel the Nautilus. We take the idea of the submarine for granted now, but in this book, Verne pretty much invented it. The ideas and concepts he introduced in the book surrounding the Nautilus must’ve been nothing short of revolutionary at the time and it’s quite an experience to read about it now, knowing that at the time of publication, no-one had ever heard of such a thing before.

The Mysterious Island has also received the film adaption treatment – twice – but it was of course the original which caught my attention as a child. In it, Verne carefully weaves a stand-alone tale into the continuation of Nemo’s story seamlessly and extremely satisfyingly. In some ways it’s an even more gripping read, and it’s fascinating to behold the ingenuity of its protagonists as they adapt to life on their new-found accidental home.

If you’re a literary stranger to Jules Verne, I’d highly recommend these two great helpings of escapism.

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October 8, 2018 · 8:41 am

Why do we need editors?

brown book page

Photo by Wendy van Zyl on Pexels.com

You know that last book you read? Did you really enjoy it?

Did something you couldn’t quite put your finger on make it just that little bit more… readable? Sure, you’ve read books with more characters and loads of detailed description and they were OK, but there was something about this which really worked.

Okay, maybe it was down to that most reliable of things which makes a book – a good story. Chances are though, it was edited too.

“What!?” I hear you cry incredulously. “You mean some things aren’t edited?”

Yes, really. There’s no taking raw talent away from a writer but no matter how original the idea, how good the narrative or how strong the characters, a good editor can be the difference between your e-book getting up there in the Amazon star ratings and getting your initially enthusiastic readers a little lost along the way.

After all, we live in busy times. Many readers want to dedicate their hard-earned book time to something which they think is worth their while.

This may all seem obvious, but the truth is, many authors who’ve put blood, sweat and tears (not to mention time) into their novels have done so without the help of an editor. The story’s still there but it’s missing something and it’s that missing ‘something’ that could be the difference between your reader abandoning ship for another of the many books out there on the great Amazonian sea.

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Filed under Authors, Editing

Ah yes, the blog

alphabet arts and crafts blog conceptual

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I don’t just edit, I write things too.

Don’t we all though? Blogs are the everyman’s mouthpiece and a licence to waffle on about anything that takes our fancy. Here I’ll be doing just that; sharing my opinions on books I’ve read or am reading, (no spoilers), offering tips, talking travel and generally just prattling on. Just check the recent posts on the right-hand side to keep up-to date.

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Filed under Editing